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In this episode, we discuss the years 426 and 425 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the current nature of Athenian politics as dominated by Kleon the anti-aristocratic demagogue, his feud withAristophanes as seen in the comedic plays “The Acharnians” and “The Knights”, the Battles of Pylos and Sphacteria that turned the Greek world upside


What makes your parents’ parents so … grand? In today’s episode, we trace the etymology and emergence of the French-influenced kinship prefix “grand.” We also look at Old English words for “grandparents” and “grandchildren” before the “grand” prefix became conventional. Just for good measure, we also take a look at the kinship prefix “great.”  To


Today, “sibling” is one of the most basic kinship terms. However, it wasn’t introduced into the language until 1903 by a pair of scientists working on genetics. More accurately, “sibling” was reintroduced into the language after 1,000 years of dormancy. In this episode, we look at “sibling” in its Old English context and explore its Indo-European


In today’s episode, we explore the origins of some of the universal characteristics of nursery father terms in languages from around the world.  For a 1-month free trial of the Great Courses Plus, click here.  


In this special guest episode, I am joined by Joe Goodkin, a Chicago-based singer/songwriter, who tours the country performing his one-man folk-opera interpretation of Homer’s Odyssey. We discuss what it’s like to be a modern bard and how that has shaped his understanding of the Homeric poems and ancient audiences, as well as what it means to be


“Mama” is a mysterious word. In the vast majority of languages around the world, the word for “mama” sounds something like … “mama.” In today’s episode, we uncover the reason for this peculiar universality. Spoiler alert: It has something to do with babies.  For a free 1-month trial of The Great Course plus, click here. 


In this special guest episode, Dr Johanna Hanink and I discuss her most recent book, How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy (Princeton University Press, 2019), what it was like to translate Thucydides, and the deeper meaning behind many of his speeches Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/06/special-guest-episode-on-translating.html


Noah Webster is best known as the father of the first trust American dictionary. However, the success of Webster’s dictionary faced an uphill struggle during his lifetime. In today’s episode, we examine some of these struggles alongside the things that made Webster’s dictionary so different from the English dictionaries that preceded it.  Click here to


Noah Webster is best known for his “all-American” dictionary, but in today’s episode, we take a look at Webster’s earlier works including The Grammatical Institute of the English Language and Dissertations on the English Language. In these works, Webster lays the groundwork for his future dictionary, revealing his political motivations for his spelling reforms and advocation of “American


In this episode, we discuss the years 427 and 426 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the destruction of Plataea, stasis in both Megara and Corcyra, and Athenian campaigns in Sicily, central Greece, and northwestern Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/094-new-leaders-and-new-strategies.html


In this episode we cover Rígsþula, or the Lay of Rig, from the Poetic Edda of Norse Mythology. We hear how Heimdall, going by Rig, visits 3 couples representing the classes of slaves, free men, and lords, and helps them to reproduce. Their divine children illustrate how the classes of men in the viking age


In this episode, we discuss the years 428 and 427 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the introduction of Kleon and Nikias, the revolt of Mytilene (Lesbos) from the Athenian empire, and a “prison-style breakout” from Plataea Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/093-revolt-in-empire.html


We are joined by Lee Accomando, host of the Viking Age Podcast! His show is one of the longest running Norse/Viking themed shows, and he certainly paved the way for us in a lot of ways so we’re excited to have him on! We had a great discussion, talking about how his podcast has developed


In this episode, we discuss the years 430 and 429 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including a failed Spartan invasion of Zakynthos and Acarnania, Phormio’s naval victories at Rhium and Naupactus, an Athenian debacle at Spartolos, the end of the siege of Potidaea, the death of Pericles and Phormio, and a Thracian invasion of Macedonia. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/092-end-of-era-part-ii.html


In this episode we return to the Kalevala with Kalevala Runo 9 – The Origin of Iron. Väinämöinen is being healed by the old man he met at the end of the last Runo, and they discuss the mythological origin of iron. This poem deals with the development of technology, both through the development of


“OK” is both the most spoken and written word in the entire world. It’s such a fundamental part of modern communication that it’s hard to imagine the world without it, yet in spite of its ubiquity and compact versatility, “OK” is under two hundred years old. Today’s episode tells the story of the word’s origins


In this episode we interview the hosts of the Saga Thing podcast, one of the longest running shows in the Norse/Viking space and a show that we personally enjoy very much. We had an entertaining talk, and a few times where they really made us think about the nature of the literature we all enjoy.


In this episode, we discuss the first year and a half of the war (431-430 BC), as both Sparta and Athens initiated their war strategies, including a Theban sneak attack on Plataea that began the war, Peloponnesian land raids on Attica, Athenian naval raids on the Peloponnese and northwestern Greece, Athenian alliances with Odrysian Thrace, a


We return to the story of the Death of Baldr through the famous poem Baldrs Draumar, or Baldr’s Dreams, where Odin rides down into the underworld to find out why his son Baldr is having bad dreams about his death. We dive into the symbolism behind Baldr and what he and his death represent, and


In this episode, we discuss the two events over 433/2 BC that led Pericles to claim that he could see war “coming out of the Peloponnese” (the Potidaean Revolt and the Megarian Embargo); the speeches given by the Corinthians, Spartans, and Athenians on the eve of war; and both sides’ financial and military resources, war aims,


In this special episode, Dr Barry Strauss and I discuss the content and the methodology behind his new book, the Ten Caesars, his podcast Antiquitas, the importance of public history and writing for non-scholars, and leadership lessons from the ancient world. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/04/special-guest-episode-on-ten-caesars.html


We continue our series on the Kalevala with Runo 8 – Väinämöinen’s Wound. Väinämöinen gets distracted on his way home from Pohjola when he sees a maiden of Pohja. She makes him complete seemingly impossible challenges in order to win her hand in marriage, and Väinämöinen makes a potentially grave mistake!


Our good friend Noah Tetzner from the History of Vikings podcast joins us for the second time on the anniversary of his podcast! We talk about some of his favorite experiences from his first year of podcasting, including visiting the Jorvik Viking Festival in York, UK.


In today’s special guest episode, I am joined by Dr. Phoebe, Mary Bryce Comstock Curator, Greek and Roman Art, at Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA). She gave me a one-on-one tour of their new “Daily Life in Ancient Greece” exhibit (in Gallery 212A-B) and allowed me to record our conversation while doing it.   Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/03/special-guest-episode-at-mfa-boston.html


One of the most defining characteristics of the Standard American English accent is “rhoticity,” or the pronunciation of the letter R. Unlike Standard British English, Standard American English always pronounces the letter R regardless of its position within a word. In today’s episode, we trace the origins and evolutions of this feature of Standard American


In this episode we read Alvissmal, or the Words of All-Wise, from the Poetic Edda. The dwarf Alvis (or All-Wise) visits Thor’s hall to bring back Thor’s daughter as his bride, and Thor acts very un-Thor-like as he deals with this unwelcome guest!


Väinämöinen has been shot down into the sea by Joukahainen. Where he goes from there and who he meets will set the biggest story of the Kalevala in motion. Join us as we find out what happens with Väinämöinen and when he meets Louhi, the mistress of Pohjola.


The English spoken in America began to diverge from the English spoken in Britain shortly after British settlers first arrived in the New World. In today’s episode, we look at several ways how “Americanisms” began to form and how English speakers on the other side of the pond reacted to them.


In this episode, we discuss the mid-5th century BC history of two areas that were important economically and politically to Athens–the west (the Sicel Revolt, Syracuse’s defeat of Akragas, the establishment of Thurii, and new Athenian alliances with Segesta, Leontini, and Rhegium) and the northeast (the founding of Brea and Amphipolis on the Strymon River and


In today’s episode, I interview linguist, professor, blogger, and author Lynne Murphy about her book, The Prodigal Tongue: The Love-Hate Relationship Between American and British English. We talk about topics such as the British media’s take on “Americanisms,” nonsensical prescriptivism, national attitudes toward language, and so much more. Lynne’s blog, Separated by a Common Language:


“American English” is the variety of English spoken in the United States of America … obviously. But is American English a language unto itself or a dialect of British English? In this episode, we discuss the differences between dialects and languages (if indeed there are any at all) from a linguistic point of view. Part


In this episode, we discuss the life, influences, drawbacks, and positives of the “Father of Scientific History”, Thucydides; and the domestic political scene in Athens in the late 440s and early 430s BC, including the ostracism of Thucydides (not the historian) and the series of personal and judicial attacks on Pericles and his three closest associates (Phidias,


In this episode, we describe the development of rhetoric in the ancient Greek world as an art that could be studied and employed in the law courts and for political purposes, and its importance especially in Classical Athens; the roles and various opinions of the Sophists, who were lecturers that traveled from city to city, teaching not


The name of “France” derives from the name of a Germanic tribe called the “Franks.” In addition to “France,” the name of the “Franks” also produced a handful of other common English words, such as frank, franchise, and Franklin, among others. Today, these words have little to do with France, but as we investigate their


In this special guest episode, Dr Amy Pistone and I have a lively discussion about ancient Greek drinking culture with a side of sports, aka how college students can relate to the ancient Greeks. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/01/special-guest-episode-on-drinking-and.html


In today’s episode, we explore the etymological connection between Turkey the country and turkey the bird. Even though turkeys are native to North America, thanks to sixteenth century trade routes, they’re mistakenly named after a country on the other side of the world. We also explore how these trade routes influenced the words for “turkey”

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The American city of “Cincinnati” derives a patriotic fraternal organization called “The Society of Cincinnati.” The society itself is named after Cincinnatus, a legendary figure in Ancient Roman history. Revolutionary Americans saw Cincinnatus as an idealized epitome of political virtue. In today’s episode, we explore Cincinnatus’ life from the point of view of early American


In this episode, part four of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the earliest astronomical observations and calculations in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt and their influence on ancient Greek astronomy; the various planets and star constellations found in Greek literature, as well as the


There are more names for Germany than there are for any other European country. This is due to a long history of disunity among Gemanic tribes and the geographical location of the Germanic homeland smack dab in the middle of Europe. In today’s episode, we explore the history and linguistic distribution of the etymological roots


In this episode, part three of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories and discoveries made by Greece’s earliest mathematicians, including Thales, Pythagoras, Hippasus and the early Pythagoreans, Oenopides, Hippocrates, Antiphon, Bryson, Democritus, and Theodoros Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/12/085-mathematics-and-early-pythagoreans.html


The English name for the country of “Wales” is not native to Wales itself. It was named by AngloSaxon settlers in Britain as a way of distinguishing themselves from their Celtic neighbors on the island. The word “Wales” has cognates in all of the Germanic languages, yet most of these cognates have nothing to do


In this episode, part two of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Pluralist School (Anaxagoras, Empedocles, and Archelaus), as well as by various other Pre-Socratic physiologoi (aka natural philosophers) not associated with a particular


On a sping day in 1986 two people walked into the Cokeville Elementary School in Cokeville Wyoming and held 154 children and adults hostage in a 50′ X 50′ room for 2 1/2 hours,  claiming that this was a revolution, and that they wanted a ransom payment of  $2 million dollars for every child in


The two were inseparable, according to legend, and this is best version I have ever heard. Actually, it combines two versions, one, in prose, from The English and Scottish Popular Ballads by Francis James Child (1888) and one in story form from Henriette Elizabeth Marshall (1905). . She based hers upon the prose. We hope


The story of hoboes- the men who rode and still ride the rails, formerly in search of employment and today in search of adventure, despite the fact that trespassing on railroad property or trains in considered a crime. The hoboes have their own unique language and a strict code of conduct and today the town


Jack London’s autobiographical story covering the years when he traveled with hoboes. Bulls was and is the hobo expression for police, who were often rough on hoboes.  Tune in to 1001 Heroes podcast for “KING OF THE ROAD”- the story of American hoboes yesterday and today. We appreciate your monthly support!  Here;s the link:  https://www.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork\


Today’s episode kicks off a new series on “toponymy,” or the study of place names. In this general overview, we take a look at some of the historical and etymological trends that most often impact place names, such as colonialism and the commemoration of important individuals.


In this episode, part one of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Eleatic School (Parmenides, Zeno, and Melissus) and the so-called Atomists (Leucippus and Democritus). Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/11/083-eleatics-and-atomists.html


The first of what will be a long running series at 1001 Heroes, this episode tells the story of heroes known and largely unknown from different periods in history and different walks of life. Today: William F. Cody- one of the world’s biggest celebrities by 1900, who brought the American West to a world audience; 


Merino Sheep and the wool they produce have been a leading Australian export for years. Australian folklorist Banjo Paterson shares his opinion of just how hard they are to cultivate in this hilarious classic short story. We appreciate your monthly support!  Here;s the link:  https://www.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork\ IF YOU ENJOY THIS STORY YOUR REVIEWS AT APPLE/ITUNES ARE


Our protagonist finds himself stranded at Innsmouth and given a room at the only hotel- a room from which he makes a narrow escape as unseen creatures start tearing down the door. We appreciate your monthly support!  Here;s the link:  https://www.patreon.com/1001storiesnetwork\ IF YOU ENJOY THIS STORY YOUR REVIEWS AT APPLE/ITUNES ARE NEEDED AND APPRECIATED! Here


The suspense heats up quickly as our narrator finds the town drunk, who, with the help of a quart of whiskey, shares an incredible story of devil worship and sacrifice. Then our narrator finds that there is no bus leaving town and he will have to stay at the only inn YOUR REVIEWS AT APPLE/ITUNES


Did you ever wonder how some of our US Presidents would do if they were paired up in a boxing ring?  1001 heroes interviews Scott Rank, the host of History Unplugged Podcast and The Presidential Fight Club podcast, and we get some unique insight on the capabilities of some of our past presidents. The match-ups:


Nowadays, a “gym” is a place for fitness and exercise. It’s a shortening of the word “gymnasium,” which ultimately derives from the Greek word gymnasion. In the Ancient Greek world, the gymnasion was not only a place for exercise, but also a hub for philsophisical study and learning. Today’s episode explores the evolution of the


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Apollo, the god of music, poetry, prophecy, truth, healing, medicine, plague, light, and knowledge, who served as a kind of symbol for young Greek boys to emulate Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/10/082-leader-of-muses.html


The story of the men and women who were convicted of treason for hosting radio shows for the enemy during wartime which undermined the efforts of their countrymen.  The personalities not all of which were convicted for treason, mentioned in this story: are: Axis Sally, Tokyo Rose, Pyongyang Sally, Hanoi Hannah, Lord Haw Haw, Baghdad,


In the court system of Ancient Athens, the kategoria was a formal accusation. However, when the philosopher Aristotle borrowed the word kategoria to enumerate his “categories of being,” he intended it to mean the “highest order of classification.” Over the course of this episode, we explore the subtle link between an “accusation” and “categorization,” in


In this special guest episode, Dr Rebecca Futo Kennedy and I have a lively discussion about race, ethnicity, immigration, and multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean in the first hour. Along the way we point out many of the misconceptions that there are on these topics, and in the second hour we discuss how these misconceptions


In this special guest episode, Dr Donna Zuckerberg and I talk about her role as Editor-in-Chief of Eidolon,which is an online journal for scholarly writing about Classics that isn’t formal scholarship. This leads us into a discussion about the importance of public-facing history. More importantly, though, we discuss her new book titled “Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Orpheus and his Mysteries; the Orphic Hymns and the Orphic Theogony; the Orphic Hymn to Melinoe and her connection to the Mysteries, Hekate, and Hermes Psychopompos; the roles of omens, divination, and itinerant seers (including the mythic figures of Tiresias, Mopsus, and Chalcias,


The Modern English word “apology” derives from the Ancient Greek word “apologia.” However, in the Ancient Greek work “Plato’s Apology,” Plato doesn’t “apologize” for anything, at least not in the modern sense. That’s because an “apology” was originally a “self-defensive” manner of speech. In this episode, we look at how this rhetorical technique developed into


In Modern English, “sophistication” is a desirable characteristic. However, the word derives from “sophistry,” an Ancient Greek intellectual movement with a historically bad reputation. In today’s episode, we consider this bad reputation from various perspectives and how it has impacted the development of “sophistic” words over the course of history.


In this special guest episode, Fiona and I discuss slavery in the ancient Roman Republic and Empire and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece (plus lots on gladiators and Spartacus!) Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/09/special-guest-episode-on-roman-slavery.html


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hekate, the goddess associated with magic, sorcery, witchcraft, knowledge of herbs and poisonous plants, crossroads, entrance-ways, ghosts, and necromancy; including her connections and/or syncretizations with Iphigenia, Artemis, Selene, the Fures, the Keres, the Semnai Theai, Empousa, Lamia, Circe, and Medea; and the “monstrous craft” of


In the pre-modern world, “philosophy” referred to all forms of intellectual knowledge. Today, the discipline of “philosophy” is just one aspect of the traditional field of philosophia, or “love of knowledge.”


n this episode, we discuss what life was like for the elderly in ancient Greece, the liminal stage between life and death, the rituals and importance of the funeral and burial, the archaeology of the Kerameikos in Athens and its significance in our understanding of Greek funerary practices, the importance of the demosion sema and


The pronoun “they” was borrowed into English from Old Norse. It’s an odd borrowing because within a given language, the words for pronouns tend to remain consistent over time. In today’s episode, we explore the entire history of “they,” from its roots as Proto-Germanic demonstrative adjective to its modern usage as a singular, gender-neutral pronoun in English.


In this episode, we discuss healing and medicine in the ancient Greek world by looking at Asklepios, Asklepieia, and the earliest physicians; Hippocrates, the Hippocratic School of Medicine, and the Hippocratic Corpus; and bacterial/viral diseases, mental diseases, and disabilities Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/08/078-healing-and-medicine.html


Subjectification is a unique linguistic process by which a word evolves to reflect the subjective viewpoint of the speaker using it. For example, the word “very” used to mean “true,” but over time, it lost its objectivity and merely became a way of emphasizing subjective points of view. In this episode, we explore this process


The word “the” is the sole definite article in the English language. It’s also the most common word in our language. However, for such a grammatically fundamental word, its history isn’t as straightforward as one might think. Old English had a whopping twenty different forms of the definite article, all of which collapsed into the


In this episode, we discuss what it was was like in ancient Athens for a young girl or boy from birth to adolescence, by looking at childbirth, childhood, the various rites of passages that they must surpass on the way to becoming teenagers, the paideia education system (both Old and New) and finally the training


The -ly suffix is a contraction hiding in plain sight. It is cognate with the word “like,” and indeed, it literally means “like.” “Sadly” is sad-like. “Madly” is mad-like. Amazingly, both “like” and “-ly” derive from a root word meaning “body or corpse.” Over the course of this episode, we try to make sense of


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Artemis, the virgin goddess of the hunt, the wilderness, the moon, and the protector of the young Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/06/076-goddess-of-young.html


In this special guest episode, Peta and I discuss a few aspects in regards to the role of women in the religious sphere of Rome and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/10/special-guest-episode-on-roman-women.html


To be or not to be? Well, if you’re conjugating the verb, you’re most likely using a form that does not sound like “to be.” “To be” is the most irregular verb in the English language, and in today’s episode, we explore why this is the case from historical and technical linguistic viewpoints.


To be or not to be? Well, if you’re conjugating the verb, you’re most likely using a form that does not sound like “to be.” “To be” is the most irregular verb in the English language, and in today’s episode, we explore why this is the case from historical and technical linguistic viewpoints.


In this episode, we discuss the medical and philosophical writings on women’s bodies, particularly the Hippocratic Corpus and Aristotle, on the topics of menstruation, pregnancy, and the “wandering womb”; the various methods and techniques for contraception, abortion, and exposure; the legal procedure for divorces (usually due to childlessness and adultery); and the ways in which adulterers


In this episode, we discuss the legal status of women in Ancient Greece (including the dowry and the epikleros), the betrothal and marriage rituals, and the ideal of separation and seclusion for women (the evidence for and against it) Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/04/074-marriage-and-domesticity.htm


In this episode, we discuss the basic designs of ancient Greek homes and what type of furniture, decoration, lighting, and so forth might be found in them; the physical and idealistic seperation between the gynakeion (women’s quarters) and the andron (men’s quarters); the pitfalls to ancient Athens as an urban city (such as the street-side


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hera, the queen of the heavens and wife of Zeus, and the guardian of women, marriage, childbirth, and the family unit Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/03/072-wrathful-queen.html


In this special guest episode, Aven and I discuss love, sex, and prostitution from the Roman perspective and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/03/special-guest-episode-on-roman.html


In this episode, we discuss Greek love and sexuality by examining the formal social institution known as pederasty; the various philosophical theories of love as described by Plato (through various speakers) in his treatise, the Symposium; the various methods in which Athenian males (and non-citizen women) were able to have sex; the depiction of nudity


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Aphrodite, the goddess of beauty, love, sexual pleasure, and procreation Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/02/070-goddess-of-seduction.html  


In this episode, we discuss the notion of the barbaroi in Greek culture; the origins and philosophical theories for slavery; and the legal status and type of roles (and importance) that slaves and metics (foreign residents) had in the Athenian economy Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/02/069-slaves-and-foreigners.html


In this episode, we discuss the various ways in which the ancient Greeks traveled, whether it was via land or sea; the physical layout of the port of Piraeus and the commercial activity that took place there; the mining district of Thorikos and how silver was mined for coinage and how coins were struck; farming


‪In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Hephaistos (the god of fire, metalworking, and blacksmiths) and Hermes (the messenger god of trade, deceit, travelers, and borders) Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/01/067-hephaistos-and-hermes.html


In this episode, we discuss the construction, the history, and the significance of the Athenian Agora, and a description of its many civic buildings that served as the nerve center for Athenian democracy, as well as the rest of the Periclean Building Program (the Temple of Hephaestus and Odeon in Athens, the Telesterion at Eleusis, and


In this episode, we discuss the construction, the history, and the significance of the main buildings on the Athenian Acropolis (the Parthenon, The Propylaia, The Temple of Athena Nike, the Erechtheion, and a few others); together, these buildings mark the high point of the glorification of Athens, and the Acropolis thus became a confident assertion


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Athena, the goddess of wisdom, craftsmanship, and strategic warfare who served as a kind of symbol for the city of Athens and civilization in general Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2017/12/064-protectress-of-athens.html The History of Ancient Greece is powered by CLNS Media Network and today’s episode is brought to you


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Poseidon, the violent and unpredictable god who ruled over the sea Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2017/11/063-lord-of-sea.html


In this episode, we discuss the Attic calendar year with a focus on the agricultural festivals; starting in the fall at the time of sowing we work our way around the year, month-by-month; particular focus is given to the Thesmophoria and the Eleusinian Mysteries but a dozen or so other festivals are described Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2017/11/062-agricultural-festivals.html


In this episode, we discuss the defining myth of Demeter and Persephone (that being her abduction by Hades), as well as the various ways in which these two were worshipped in the Peloponnese and in Magna Graecia (not including Eleusis and Athens) Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2017/11/061-two-goddesses.html   Intro by Steve Guerra of the History of the Papacy


In this episode, we discuss the mysterious, shadowy figure of Hades (king of the Underworld), necromancy (the summoning of the dead), and Homer’s description of the abode of Hades in Book Eleven of the Odyssey and then comparing and contrasting that with the description found in Virgil’s Aeneid Book Six, all while taking a tour of the Underworld, its major


In this episode, we discuss the mighty patriarch who ruled over Mount Olympus  Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2017/10/059-olympian-zeus.html   Intro by Lee Accomando of the Viking Age Podcast Website: http://vikingagepodcast.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vikingagepod Twitter: https://twitter.com/VikingAgePod


And when we woke up, we had these bodies. They’re like, except I’m having them! Oh, I think we should just stay friends. You’ll have all the Slurm you can drink when you’re partying with Slurms McKenzie Hey, tell me something. You’ve got all this money. How come you always dress like you’re doing your