The History of Ancient Greece Podcast is a weekly deep-dive into one of the most influential and fundamental peoples in Western Civilization. Hosted by philhellene Ryan Stitt, THOAG spans over two millennia. From the Bronze Age to Homer, to classical Greek democracy to the Roman conquest, this podcast will tell the history of a fundamental civilization by bringing to life the fascinating stories of all the ancient sources and archaeological discoveries. And not just military and political history, but their society, how the Greeks lived day-to-day, as well as their culture—their art, architecture, philosophy, literature, religion, science, and all the other incredible aspects of the Greek achievement.

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In this episode, we discuss the years 417-415 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the ostracism of Hyperbolus, the rivalry of Nikias and Alcibiades, the siege of Melos, the lead up and first year of the Sicilian Expedition, and the prosecutions for the Hermai and Eleusinian Mysteries scandals.   Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2020/01/099-frustrations-and-poor-decisions.html   Intro by


In this episode, we discuss the years 421-418 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the breakdowns of the Peace of Nikias; the rise of Alcibiades to prominence at Athens; the differences that arose between Sparta and some of their dissident allies; the diplomatic maneuverings that resulted in the quadruple alliance between Athens, Argos, Mantinea, and Elis;


In this special guest episode, Dr. Moudhy Al-Rashid and I discuss ancient Mesopotamian medicine, in general, and her current research on the use of metaphor in descriptions of mental distress in cuneiform medical texts   Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/11/special-guest-episode-on-mesopotamian.html


In this special guest episode, Dr. Liz Gloyn and I discuss her forthcoming book, Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2019). This work is the first in-depth study on classical reception and monsters in Anglo-American popular culture from the 1950s to the present day. Throughout the book, Dr. Gloyn reveals the trends behind how we


In this episode, we discuss the years 423-421 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the death of Artaxerxes and the succession struggle that ends with Darius II on the Persian throne; the continuation of Brasidas’ Thracian and Macedonian campaign; the ‘Wasps’ and ‘Peace’ by Aristophanes; and the deaths of Brasidas and Kleon during the second battle


In this episode, we discuss the years 425 and 424 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the conclusion of the First Sicilian Expedition and the Congress of Gela, the Athenian seizure of Kythera, the Battles of Megara and Delium, and the beginning of Brasidas’ Thracian campaign Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/09/096-athens-on-offensive.html


In this episode, we discuss the years 426 and 425 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the current nature of Athenian politics as dominated by Kleon the anti-aristocratic demagogue, his feud withAristophanes as seen in the comedic plays “The Acharnians” and “The Knights”, the Battles of Pylos and Sphacteria that turned the Greek world upside


In this special guest episode, I am joined by Joe Goodkin, a Chicago-based singer/songwriter, who tours the country performing his one-man folk-opera interpretation of Homer’s Odyssey. We discuss what it’s like to be a modern bard and how that has shaped his understanding of the Homeric poems and ancient audiences, as well as what it means to be


In this special guest episode, Dr Johanna Hanink and I discuss her most recent book, How to Think about War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy (Princeton University Press, 2019), what it was like to translate Thucydides, and the deeper meaning behind many of his speeches Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/06/special-guest-episode-on-translating.html


In this episode, we discuss the years 427 and 426 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the destruction of Plataea, stasis in both Megara and Corcyra, and Athenian campaigns in Sicily, central Greece, and northwestern Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/094-new-leaders-and-new-strategies.html


In this episode, we discuss the years 428 and 427 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including the introduction of Kleon and Nikias, the revolt of Mytilene (Lesbos) from the Athenian empire, and a “prison-style breakout” from Plataea Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/093-revolt-in-empire.html


In this episode, we discuss the years 430 and 429 BC of the Peloponnesian War, including a failed Spartan invasion of Zakynthos and Acarnania, Phormio’s naval victories at Rhium and Naupactus, an Athenian debacle at Spartolos, the end of the siege of Potidaea, the death of Pericles and Phormio, and a Thracian invasion of Macedonia. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/05/092-end-of-era-part-ii.html


In this episode, we discuss the first year and a half of the war (431-430 BC), as both Sparta and Athens initiated their war strategies, including a Theban sneak attack on Plataea that began the war, Peloponnesian land raids on Attica, Athenian naval raids on the Peloponnese and northwestern Greece, Athenian alliances with Odrysian Thrace, a


In this episode, we discuss the two events over 433/2 BC that led Pericles to claim that he could see war “coming out of the Peloponnese” (the Potidaean Revolt and the Megarian Embargo); the speeches given by the Corinthians, Spartans, and Athenians on the eve of war; and both sides’ financial and military resources, war aims,


In this special episode, Dr Barry Strauss and I discuss the content and the methodology behind his new book, the Ten Caesars, his podcast Antiquitas, the importance of public history and writing for non-scholars, and leadership lessons from the ancient world. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/04/special-guest-episode-on-ten-caesars.html


In today’s special guest episode, I am joined by Dr. Phoebe, Mary Bryce Comstock Curator, Greek and Roman Art, at Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA). She gave me a one-on-one tour of their new “Daily Life in Ancient Greece” exhibit (in Gallery 212A-B) and allowed me to record our conversation while doing it.   Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/03/special-guest-episode-at-mfa-boston.html


In this episode, we discuss the mid-5th century BC history of two areas that were important economically and politically to Athens–the west (the Sicel Revolt, Syracuse’s defeat of Akragas, the establishment of Thurii, and new Athenian alliances with Segesta, Leontini, and Rhegium) and the northeast (the founding of Brea and Amphipolis on the Strymon River and


In this episode, we discuss the life, influences, drawbacks, and positives of the “Father of Scientific History”, Thucydides; and the domestic political scene in Athens in the late 440s and early 430s BC, including the ostracism of Thucydides (not the historian) and the series of personal and judicial attacks on Pericles and his three closest associates (Phidias,


In this episode, we describe the development of rhetoric in the ancient Greek world as an art that could be studied and employed in the law courts and for political purposes, and its importance especially in Classical Athens; the roles and various opinions of the Sophists, who were lecturers that traveled from city to city, teaching not


In this special guest episode, Dr Amy Pistone and I have a lively discussion about ancient Greek drinking culture with a side of sports, aka how college students can relate to the ancient Greeks. Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2019/01/special-guest-episode-on-drinking-and.html


In this episode, part four of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the earliest astronomical observations and calculations in ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt and their influence on ancient Greek astronomy; the various planets and star constellations found in Greek literature, as well as the


In this episode, part three of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories and discoveries made by Greece’s earliest mathematicians, including Thales, Pythagoras, Hippasus and the early Pythagoreans, Oenopides, Hippocrates, Antiphon, Bryson, Democritus, and Theodoros Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/12/085-mathematics-and-early-pythagoreans.html


In this episode, part two of five on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Pluralist School (Anaxagoras, Empedocles, and Archelaus), as well as by various other Pre-Socratic physiologoi (aka natural philosophers) not associated with a particular


In this episode, part one of four on a series on Greek philosophy, mathematics, and science in the 5th century BC, we describe the lives, influences, and various theories put forth by the Eleatic School (Parmenides, Zeno, and Melissus) and the so-called Atomists (Leucippus and Democritus). Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/11/083-eleatics-and-atomists.html


In this episode, we discuss the myths, iconography, and cultic worship of Apollo, the god of music, poetry, prophecy, truth, healing, medicine, plague, light, and knowledge, who served as a kind of symbol for young Greek boys to emulate Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/10/082-leader-of-muses.html


In this special guest episode, Dr Rebecca Futo Kennedy and I have a lively discussion about race, ethnicity, immigration, and multiculturalism in the ancient Mediterranean in the first hour. Along the way we point out many of the misconceptions that there are on these topics, and in the second hour we discuss how these misconceptions


In this special guest episode, Dr Donna Zuckerberg and I talk about her role as Editor-in-Chief of Eidolon,which is an online journal for scholarly writing about Classics that isn’t formal scholarship. This leads us into a discussion about the importance of public-facing history. More importantly, though, we discuss her new book titled “Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny


In this special guest episode, Fiona and I discuss slavery in the ancient Roman Republic and Empire and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece (plus lots on gladiators and Spartacus!) Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/09/special-guest-episode-on-roman-slavery.html


In this special guest episode, Peta and I discuss a few aspects in regards to the role of women in the religious sphere of Rome and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/10/special-guest-episode-on-roman-women.html


In this special guest episode, Aven and I discuss love, sex, and prostitution from the Roman perspective and compare/contrast it with ancient Greece Show Notes: http://www.thehistoryofancientgreece.com/2018/03/special-guest-episode-on-roman.html