Words for Granted is a podcast that looks at how words change over time. Each episode looks at the evolution of a single word. Host Ray Belli uses language—more specifically, individual words—to examine history, culture, society, religion, and more.

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The English name for the country of “Wales” is not native to Wales itself. It was named by AngloSaxon settlers in Britain as a way of distinguishing themselves from their Celtic neighbors on the island. The word “Wales” has cognates in all of the Germanic languages, yet most of these cognates have nothing to do


Today’s episode kicks off a new series on “toponymy,” or the study of place names. In this general overview, we take a look at some of the historical and etymological trends that most often impact place names, such as colonialism and the commemoration of important individuals.


Nowadays, a “gym” is a place for fitness and exercise. It’s a shortening of the word “gymnasium,” which ultimately derives from the Greek word gymnasion. In the Ancient Greek world, the gymnasion was not only a place for exercise, but also a hub for philsophisical study and learning. Today’s episode explores the evolution of the


In the court system of Ancient Athens, the kategoria was a formal accusation. However, when the philosopher Aristotle borrowed the word kategoria to enumerate his “categories of being,” he intended it to mean the “highest order of classification.” Over the course of this episode, we explore the subtle link between an “accusation” and “categorization,” in


The Modern English word “apology” derives from the Ancient Greek word “apologia.” However, in the Ancient Greek work “Plato’s Apology,” Plato doesn’t “apologize” for anything, at least not in the modern sense. That’s because an “apology” was originally a “self-defensive” manner of speech. In this episode, we look at how this rhetorical technique developed into


In Modern English, “sophistication” is a desirable characteristic. However, the word derives from “sophistry,” an Ancient Greek intellectual movement with a historically bad reputation. In today’s episode, we consider this bad reputation from various perspectives and how it has impacted the development of “sophistic” words over the course of history.


In the pre-modern world, “philosophy” referred to all forms of intellectual knowledge. Today, the discipline of “philosophy” is just one aspect of the traditional field of philosophia, or “love of knowledge.”


The pronoun “they” was borrowed into English from Old Norse. It’s an odd borrowing because within a given language, the words for pronouns tend to remain consistent over time. In today’s episode, we explore the entire history of “they,” from its roots as Proto-Germanic demonstrative adjective to its modern usage as a singular, gender-neutral pronoun in English.


Subjectification is a unique linguistic process by which a word evolves to reflect the subjective viewpoint of the speaker using it. For example, the word “very” used to mean “true,” but over time, it lost its objectivity and merely became a way of emphasizing subjective points of view. In this episode, we explore this process


The word “the” is the sole definite article in the English language. It’s also the most common word in our language. However, for such a grammatically fundamental word, its history isn’t as straightforward as one might think. Old English had a whopping twenty different forms of the definite article, all of which collapsed into the


The -ly suffix is a contraction hiding in plain sight. It is cognate with the word “like,” and indeed, it literally means “like.” “Sadly” is sad-like. “Madly” is mad-like. Amazingly, both “like” and “-ly” derive from a root word meaning “body or corpse.” Over the course of this episode, we try to make sense of


To be or not to be? Well, if you’re conjugating the verb, you’re most likely using a form that does not sound like “to be.” “To be” is the most irregular verb in the English language, and in today’s episode, we explore why this is the case from historical and technical linguistic viewpoints.


To be or not to be? Well, if you’re conjugating the verb, you’re most likely using a form that does not sound like “to be.” “To be” is the most irregular verb in the English language, and in today’s episode, we explore why this is the case from historical and technical linguistic viewpoints.