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    EXCLUSIVE: Koch Brothers, Republicans “Scrambling” as Virginia GOP Candidate Vigorously Supports Confederate Monuments

    Establishment Republicans are petrified of the possibility of Corey Stewart becoming the GOP’s nominee for Senate in Virginia

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    FILE - In this Feb. 22, 2018 file photo, Virginia GOP senatorial hopeful, Corey Stewart, gestures during a news conference at the Capitol in Richmond, Va. Stewart, a conservative provocateur and supporter of President Donald Trump won Virginia's Republican primary Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in the U.S. Senate race, and he has promised to run a "vicious" campaign against incumbent Tim Kaine. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

    Establishment Republicans are petrified of the possibility of Corey Stewart becoming the GOP’s nominee for Senate in Virginia

     

    It’s hard to imagine how a Senate candidate in a purple state on the East Coast can run a campaign that could potentially have such a significant ripple effect on an entire party’s chances across all ballots throughout the country.

    Welcome to 2018!

    According to not just leading political science experts, but to the business interests of the Republican party itself — it can.

    So what, or more importantly, WHO is causing such a stir?

    “[Virginia GOP Senate candidate] Corey Stewart has used the Confederate symbols and Civil War [rebel] monuments as the base of his support,” said Emerson Polling pollster Spencer Kimball in an exclusive interview with CLNS Media.

    Kimball, a political science expert and veteran campaign advisor said that “Republicans are not just concerned in Virginia but around the country.”  And that Stewart “will be perceived as promoting racism or some sort of antagonism in society.”

    Stewart, who has a background as an attorney, has conveyed a campaign message which has enraged just as many as it has invigorated.

    Nonetheless, it has enveloped a cascade of questions: Can, and will the Democrats take advantage of the continued ideological discord within the GOP? Would a purple state such as Virginia tolerate such politics? Will the GOP, just as they did with Trump, end up supporting Stewart?

    And the most important question: How much of an impact will Stewart’s rhetorical support of Confederate monuments in Virginia have throughout the country?

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